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Tradex Technologies

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Tradex Technologies Inc. was a U.S. electronic commerce company that developed a completely Java-based business-to-business (B2B) software in the 1990s.[1]

History

Tradex software originally grew out of an Internet marketplace[2]produced by the Swiss computer manufacturer Dynabit in 1995[1]. In 1996, Daniel Aegerter founded TRADEX Technologies in Tampa, Fla. out of his company Dynabit,[1] to further the development of e-commerce software for various Internet marketplaces[2].
In 1996, the company received an award from the Gartner Group and InformationWeek (digital magazine) as the best Internet B2B e-commerce solution.
By 1999, Tradex was finally the market leader with its Tradex Commerce Center product; the company had six offices in the United States and one each in London and Tokyo[1]. Tradex’s customer base included American Express, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone (NTT), Chemdex, MetalSite, Electronic Data Systems (EDS), Raytheon, and others[1].

Sale to Ariba

During the dot-com boom, Tradex was initially sold in December 1999 for $1.86 billion to U.S.-based Ariba Inc[1]. However, by the time the transaction was completed in March 2000, the stock price of the merged company in which Tradex shareholders had an interest had increased[2] and the sale was eventually worth $5.6 billion[3]. The closing of the sale in March 2000 coincided exactly with the peak of the dot-com bubble and was, by 2004, the world’s largest corporate acquisition in the software industry[4].

Individual references

  1. a b c d e f Dynabit founder Aegerter sells Tradex to Ariba for $1.8 billion, Swiss IT Reseller (mvb). 17 December 1999. archived on Original 4 March 2016. retrieved 5 October 2011.
  2. a b c Sandra Escher: Seriousventure capitalist, HandelsZeitung. 11 July 2001. retrieved 6 October 2011.@1@2Template:Dead Link/www.ionewmanagement.ch(page no longer available, search web archives ) Info: Thelink was automatically marked as broken. Please check the link according to the instructions and then remove this notice.
  3. Thomas Wyss and Thomas Hengartner, Interview with Daniel Aegerter, “The most important word is no”, Finanz und Wirtschaft, Allgemeine Anlagen, 29 May 2010.
  4. Marc Fischer: With theArmada on a treasure hunt, interview with Daniel Aegerter, stocks.ch. 20 April 2006. retrieved 5 October 2011.@1@2Template:Dead link/invest.stocks.ch(page no longer available, search web archives ) Info: Thelink was automatically marked as broken. Please check the link according to the instructions and then remove this notice.