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Thomas Reuter (Musiker)

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Thomas Reuter (* 20 January 1952 in Eisenach) is a German composer, choir director and pianist with a focus on improvised music.

Life

Thomas Reuter was born in 1952 in Eisenach, Thuringia, the son of conductor Rolf Reuter and singer Anemone Rau. In his childhood he received piano and violin lessons. After graduating from the Thomasschule in Leipzig, he studied music at the Hochschule für Musik in Leipzig from 1970 to 1976[1] at the Academy of Music “Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy” Leipzig. Among his teachers were Fritz Geißler[1] and Siegfried Thiele in composition, Hans Volger in piano and Rolf Reuter in conducting. He received further inspiration from the composer and priest Lothar Reubke, and took private singing lessons in Dresden.

He then worked as a senior assistant for choir, music theory, composition and improvisation at the Special School of Music in Halle/Saale.[1] He also worked as a composer. Thus he created for the Staatskapelle Dresden[2] and the Dresden Philharmonic[3] Chamber music works. His pieces were performed in the GDR and in the so-called Eastern Bloc. In 1989 his father conducted the orchestra of the Komische Oper (with soloist Jan Vogler)[4] at the premiere of Reuter’s Violoncello Concerto.[5] He was repeatedly awarded music prizes in the GDR. The musicologist Gilbert Stöck (2008) counted him among those composers in the Halle-Magdeburg region “who were completely or primarily involved in the exploration of new and the latest material positions”.[6]

In 1977 he co-founded the group Freie Musik Dresden. He has been active as an improvisational musician in many different ways. With violinist Rike Kohlhepp he formed the IndiviDuo from 1998 to 2011. In 2003 they formed the nu ART trio with saxophonist Andreas Krennerich. In 2008 he entered into the PLASMA 8 with Krennerich. In 2012 he formed the duo SELBANDER with singer Angelika Remlinger. In 2013, Remlinger and Krennerich formed the trio jo.FEUERBACH.

He is also the choirmaster of the women’s chamber choir vocaLumen in Hanover. For the ensemble he set several poems by the lyricist Paul Celan to music.

He is also musically active in the Christian Community.

Awards

  • 1986: Hans Stieber Prize[7]
  • 1990: Handel Prize of the Halle district[8]

Works (selection)

His works[1] have been published by C. F. Peters and Verlag Neue Musik, among others.

  • Wandlungen (1980) for flute, string trio and piano
  • Stufen (1982/83) for flute, viola and violoncello
  • Zeitspiele (1983) for piano
  • Wind quintet (1984/85)
  • String quartet (1985/86)
  • Half of Life (1986) for soprano, oboe, violin, violoncello and piano

Literature

  • Thomas Heyn: In a small country of order and security. Young composers of the GDR and their music. In: MusikTexte 8 (1990) 33/34, pp. 44-50.

Web links

Individual references

  1. a b c d Thomas Heyn: In a small country of order and security. Young composers of the GDR and their music. In: MusikTexte 8 (1990) 33/34, pp. 44-50, here: S. 49.
  2. Michael Heinemann: Staatskapelle und Neue Musik. In: Matthias Herrmann, Hanns-Werner Heister (eds.): Dresden und die avancierte Musik im 20. Jahrhundert. Report on the colloquium organized by the Dresden Centre for Contemporary Music and the Institute for Musicology of the Dresden University of Music “Carl Maria von Weber” (= Music in Dresden. Vol. 6). Part 3: 1966-1999. Laaber, Laaber 2004, ISBN 3-89007-511-8, pp. 243-268, here: P. 252 and P. 254.
  3. Andrea Wolter: Contemporary chamber music in Dresden 1966-1999. In: Matthias Herrmann, Hanns-Werner Heister (eds.): Dresden und die avancierte Musik im 20. Jahrhundert. Report on the colloquium organized by the Dresden Centre for Contemporary Music and the Institute for Musicology of the Hochschule für Musik “Carl Maria von Weber” Dresden (= Music in Dresden. Vol. 6). Part 3: 1966-1999. Laaber, Laaber 2004, ISBN 3-89007-511-8, pp. 269-288, here: S. 276.
  4. Plans for the new season of the Komische Oper. In: Neue Zeit, 29 September 1989, Vol. 45, Issue 230, p. 4.
  5. World premiere at the Berlin Festival. Programs with renowned artists and orchestras. In: Neues Deutschland, 18 October 1989, Vol. 44, Issue 245, p. 1.
  6. Gilbert Stöck: New Music in the Districts of Halle and Magdeburg at the Time of the GDR. Compositions, politics, institutions. Schröder, Leipzig 2008, ISBN 978-3-926196-50-7, p. 238.
  7. Hans Stieber Prize winner at the Landesverband Sachsen-Anhalt Deutscher Komponisten e. V.(Memento from 13 October 2019)
  8. Christoph Rink: Chronology of the Handel Prize. In: Mitteilungen des Freundes- und Förderkreises des Händel-Hauses zu Halle e.V. 1/2012, pp. 20-25, here: S. 25.