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Karl Bernt

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Residential and commercial building Holm 63, 1908, with the coat of arms of the reep beater family Landt (cf. street section Katsund)

Residential house Am Burgfried 11, 1904

Three-family house Marienhölzungsweg 47, 1912, by master mason Andr. Jensen with the collaboration of Karl Bart[1][2]

Residential and commercial building Nikolaistraße 10, 1905, at that time with the first cinema in the city, the “Kosmorama”

Hotel Seewarte in the Mürwik district, 1906

Corner house Gertrudenstraße 1, 1913-1915

Parkhof in Mürwik, 1925-1928

House Hermann-Löns-Weg 18, 1934

Residential block Dr.-Todsen-Straße 2-4, 1935/1936 (as continuation of the arcade building Südermarkt 7)

Karl Bernt (* 8 October 1871; † 27 July 1952 in Flensburg[3]) was a German architect who worked in Flensburg between 1903 and 1938.[4] Bernt’s architectural language evolved from Art Nouveau and Reform architecture to Brick Expressionism.[5]

Life and work

In 1903, Karl Bernt’s first verifiable building in the city of Flensburg was the four-storey Art Nouveau tenement at Glücksburger Straße 28.[6] In the years that followed, Bernt became a busy architect who created numerous buildings that shaped the cityscape.[5] In 1905, Karl Bernt erected the three-storey residential and commercial building Marienstraße 61 on the square at the upper Marienstraße (“Kuhgangsplatz”). For this building, Bernt reverted to plans by Alexander Wilhelm Prale, which he modernized with new stylistic elements and thus largely changed. Bernt’s newly designed façade consists of a mixture of Art Nouveau and country house elements. Only the spatial division of the building was still taken over by Bernt from Prale.[7] One year later Bernt built the Hotel Seewarte in Flensburg-Mürwik. In 1906 Bernt also redesigned the front building of the Zuckerhof, which had housed a sugar refinery at the beginning of the 19th century. Two shops were added to the ground floor of the building at Norderstraße 31, along with a central entrance. The façade was set back three metres and redesigned by Bernt.[8][9]

From 1898 onwards until 1912, the surviving dwellings on Brix Street in the Jürgensby district were built. Some houses in this area were also built by Karl Bernt. Among other things, he may have been involved in the 1907 Brixstraße 19 residence there.[10] In 1908-1909 Bernt participated in the construction of the Flurstraße in the district Westliche Höhe with three houses.[11] In 1908-1909, high-quality apartment buildings were built in Clädenstraße, primarily by Karl Bernt. The generously equipped residential buildings were intended to meet the expected demand of higher naval batches, which was expected due to the establishment of the Mürwik Naval School. However, since the naval school was completed later than the builder of the Clädenstraßen houses had expected, the officers of the naval school failed to come as customers and the builder went bankrupt beforehand. The city bought the buildings at auction in 1911. Afterwards Paul Ziegler and later also the painter and draughtsman Günter Messenbrink lived there.[12][13] In 1911-1913, the buildings Ulmenstraße 15 and 16 at the head of the St. Jürgen staircase were built not far from Clädenstraße according to plans by Karl Bernt.[14][15] Furthermore, a large number of residential buildings were built on Bismarckstraße in 1911-1916, some of which were also designed by Karl Bernt.[16]

Among the large number of residential and commercial buildings designed by Karl Bernt is, for example, the unusual corner building Große Straße 39/41 on Heiligengeistgang, dating from 1911, which is notable for its stately plaster façade with gold-coloured panels depicting antique figures.[17] Since 1914 the villa Clädenstraße 11 was built according to plans by Karl Bernt, which was probably not completed until 1918 due to the war. The villa was designed in a restrained manner in the spirit of reform architecture.[18] Around 1925 Karl Bernt obviously turned to Heimatschutz architecture. Whereas his previous buildings had plaster facades,[19] were now followed by buildings with brick facades.[20] In 1925-1928, for example, the Parkhof, which Bernt planned in collaboration with Karl Frehse, was built in the Heimatschutz style.[21] In 1935/1936 he continued Paul Ziegler’s and Theodor Rieve’s corner building at Südermarkt 7 by adding another apartment block to the south. Bernt was assisted by Theodor Rieve in this new building on Dr.-Todsen-Straße 2-4. Originally, arcades were to be inserted on the ground floor of the yellow-stone building to continue the arcade course of the neighbouring Südermarkt building, but this was discarded for financial reasons.[22] Bernt’s last residence was built in 1936-1938 in the Sandberg district.[23]

Works

  • 1903: four-storey apartment building Glücksburger Straße 28 in Flensburg; plaster facade with Art Nouveau decoration[6]
  • 1904: Residential building Am Burgfried 11 in Flensburg; located on the edge of the Duburga area[24]
  • 1905: Residential and commercial building at Nikolaistraße 10 in Flensburg[25][26]
    In this building with its elaborate art nouveau facade[26] the Kosmorama cinema was located in the right ground floor wing. The Kosmorama was Flensburg’s first cinema ever. It was opened on September 8th 1906. It showed silent films with musical accompaniment by a piano.[27]
  • 1905: Residential and commercial building at Marienstraße 61 in Flensburg (“Kuhgangsplatz”)[7]
  • 1906: Hotel Seewarte in Flensburg-Mürwik[28]
  • 1907: Residential and commercial building Brixstraße 5 in Flensburg[29]
  • 1908: Residential and commercial building Holm 63 in Flensburg; former house of the reep beater family Landt von Katsund[30]
  • 1908: Residential buildings Mathildenstraßen 17 and 18; No. 17 with brick facade of reform architecture or Heimatschutzarchitektur, rather plain in design, with the exception of the neo-baroque portal.[31][32]
  • 1908: Residential and commercial building Brixstraße 29 / Bremerplatz in Flensburg[33]
  • 1908-1909: Residential building Bau’er Landstraße 15 in Flensburg; plaster facade with Art Nouveau decoration[34]
  • 1908-1909: Residential buildings Flurstraße 11, 17 and 19 in Flensburg[35]
  • 1908-1913: four-storey residential buildings for senior naval batches Clädenstraße 3, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 in Flensburg[36]
  • 1908-1910: Residential buildings Bremerplatz 2-3 in Flensburg; corner house No. 3 with commercial building area[37]
  • 1909-1911: Residential buildings Dorotheenstraße 34-38 in Flensburg; façade designs commissioned by master mason Andr. Jensen (building not preserved)
    The street section only got its current appearance after the First World War through the expansion and reconstruction of the St.-Franziskus-Hospital.[38]
  • 1910: Apartment buildings Nordergraben 64-68 inFlensburg; four-storey plaster buildings with varied facades in sophisticated reform architecture with neoclassical echoes[39][5]
  • 1910-1911: three-storey residential buildings Jürgensgaarder Straße 31, 33 and 35 in Flensburg[40]
  • 1911: Residential house Apenrader Straße 61 in Flensburg[41]
  • 1911: Residential and commercial building Große Straße 39/41 in Flensburg, on the Heiligengeistgang[42]
  • 1911-1912: Residential and commercial building Norderstraße 9 in Flensburg[43]
  • 1911-1913: The Two Beautiful Sisters, two four-storey apartment buildings Ulmenstraße 15 and 18, on the corner of Brixstraße, in Flensburg; above the St. Jürgen Stairs[44][45]
  • 1911-1916: Residential buildings at Bismarckstraße 55-75 and 56-74 in Flensburg[46]
  • 1912: Three-family house Marienhölzungsweg 47 in Flensburg; facade designs for master mason Andr. Jensen[47][48]
  • 1912: three-storey residential buildings Brixstraße 21-27 in Flensburg[49]
  • 1913-1914: three-storey residential buildings Nikolaiallee 6-8 and Klaus-Groth-Straße 2 in Flensburg[50]
  • 1913-1915: Corner house Marienhölzungsweg / Gertrudenstraße 1 in Flensburg; facade designs for master mason Andr. Jensen[51]
  • 1914: three-storey residential building St.-Jürgen-Platz 4 in Flensburg[52]
  • 1914-1918: Villa Clädenstraße 11, Flensburg[18]
  • 1921 Extension of the building stock of the steam chocolate factory Munketoft 7 in Flensburg (not preserved)[53][54]
  • 1924-1926: Residential building Bismarckstraße 102 in Flensburg[37]
  • 1925: House Friedrichstal 38 in Flensburg[55]
  • 1925-1926: three-storey residential building St.-Jürgen-Platz 2 in Flensburg; similar to the residential and commercial building St.-Jürgen-Platz 1, which was built at the same time[52]
  • 1925-1926: Row of houses Adelbyer Kirchenweg 210 in Flensburg[56]
  • 1925-1928: Parkhof in Flensburg-Mürwik; construction management by Karl Frehse[57]
  • 1926-1927: Apartment building group Katharinenstraße 15-25, Kastanienweg 14,15 and Zur Exe 16 in Flensburg[58]
  • 1927: Residential house Bismarckstraße 100 in Flensburg[37]
  • 1927-1928: Villa Adelbyer Kirchenweg 9 in Flensburg[56]
  • 1928–1930: Residential buildings Schwalbenstraße 11-15 and 25-27 in Flensburg; three-storey buildings in sand-lime brick, facades partly in Fehlbrand brick[59]
  • 1929: two-storey semi-detached house Adelbyer Kirchenweg 3/5 in Flensburg[56]
  • 1930-1931: Administrative building of the local health insurance fund of the city of Flensburg (AOK), Waitzstraße 2, Heinrichstraße 21; three-storey clinker brick building with hipped roof, at the entrance coloured glazing with Flensburg coat of arms[60]
  • 1934: Eave house Hermann-Löns-Weg 18 in Flensburg; brick masonry partly in misfired bricks[61]
  • 1935-1936: Residential block Dr.-Todsen-Straße 2-4 in Flensburg; continuation of the corner building Südermarkt 7, in collaboration with city architect Theodor Rieve[22]
  • 1936-1938: three-storey residential buildings Sandberg 35-37 and Schreiberstraße 23 in Flensburg; The house at Schreiberstraße 23 was apparently dedicated to Peter Christian Hansen, who had died in 1935. A plaque with a corresponding dedication commemorates this.[23]

Individual references

  1. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 408
  2. Eiko Wenzel, Henrik Gram: Zeitzeichen, Architektur in Flensburg, p. 94
  3. Registry office Flensburg: Death register. No. 810/1952.
  4. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6.
  5. a b c Eiko Wenzel, Henrik Gram: Zeitzeichen, Architektur in Flensburg, p. 97
  6. a b Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography Federal Republic of Germany], Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 502.
  7. a b Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 198.
  8. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 216.
  9. Eiko Wenzel, Henrik Gram: Zeitzeichen, Architektur in Flensburg, p. 62
  10. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, pages 492, 494 and 518.
  11. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 374 ff.
  12. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 496 ff.
  13. Urban history. Fascination Clädenstraße. In: Flensburger Tageblatt, 4 December 2009; retrieved 29 December 2016
  14. Eiko Wenzel, Henrik Gram: Zeitzeichen, Architektur in Flensburg, p. 119
  15. Flensburg-Mobil, The St. Jürgen Staircase, retrieved on: 29. December 2016
  16. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 98 and 486 ff.
  17. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 156; The business building in question was later used in various ways. In former times there was for example a dance hall, today the fantasy shop “Gandalph” can be found there.
  18. a b Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 498.
  19. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, pages 212, 320 and 354.
  20. A somewhat earlier exception was the residential building Mathildenstraße 17, which was built as early as 1908 by Karl Bernt with a brick façade. – Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, p. 412.
  21. Eiko Wenzel, Henrik Gram: Zeitzeichen, Architektur in Flensburg, p. 131
  22. a b Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 144.
  23. a b Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 570.
  24. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 354.
  25. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 204.
  26. a b Eiko Wenzel, Henrik Gram: Zeitzeichen, Architektur in Flensburg, p. 39
  27. The first cinemas in Flensburg, retrieved on: 27. December 2016
  28. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 542.
  29. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 492.
  30. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 180.
  31. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 412.
  32. Eiko Wenzel, Henrik Gram: Zeitzeichen, Architektur in Flensburg, p. 100
  33. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 494.
  34. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 320.
  35. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 376 f.
  36. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 496 and 498.
  37. a b c Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 490.
  38. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 404 and 370.
  39. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 438.
  40. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 508.
  41. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 314.
  42. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 156.
  43. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 212.
  44. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 518.
  45. Ulmenstraße 15. residents celebrate 100th birthday of their house. In: Flensburger Tageblatt, 29 August 2012; retrieved 28 December 2016
  46. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 486 and 488; Not by Karl Bernt is the corner building Bismarckstraße 64, which visually fits into the rest of the development.
  47. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 408.
  48. Eiko Wenzel, Henrik Gram: Zeitzeichen, Architektur in Flensburg, p. 94
  49. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 494.
  50. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 434.
  51. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 386 f.
  52. a b Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 514.
  53. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 598.
  54. Flensburg Südstadt Bahnhofsumfeld Vorbereitende Untersuchungen nach §141 BauGB(Memento of the Originals of 4 March 2016 in the Internet Archive) Info:The archive linkwas inserted automatically and has not yet been checked. Please check original and archive link according to instructions and then remove this note.@1@2Template:Webachiv/IABot/www.ihrsan.de, p. 31 f.
  55. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 330 f.
  56. a b c Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 482.
  57. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 546.
  58. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 394.
  59. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 346 f. and 390.
  60. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 306.
  61. Lutz Wilde (editor): Flensburg. (= Monument Topography of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cultural Monuments in Schleswig-Holstein, Volume 2) Wachholtz, Neumünster 2001, ISBN 3-529-02521-6, page 390.

Web links

Commons: Karl Bernt– Collection of images, videos and audio files