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Kaptromancy

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Kaptromancy is a method of mantic and belongs to the field of goëtie. It belongs to the variants of hydromancy, gastromancy, leconomancy and is a genre of ceremonial magic that involves the divination of the future by means of water.

Origin and practices

It is said to be testified that, according to Septimius Severus (146 – 211), Emperor Didius Julianus (c. 133/137 – 193) was fond of captromancy and made frequent use of it. It was also reported that near Patra at the temple of Minerva a spring gushed forth, which served as an oracle. A mirror was placed in this healing spring and the sick person looked at the mirror through the surface of the water, in it he could see the outcome of his illness. A similar form was reported from a spring at Achaia in front of a temple of Ceres; in this ceremonial the sick person had a mirror sunk into the water on a string and could then see the whole course of the disease[1].

Another practice describes that a basin is filled with water, after a certain period of mental effort and under additional ceremonies it is expected that air spirits can be summoned. Another aid is a mirror which has been lowered in the filled basin of water. A medium, for example, a young boy or a young pregnant woman, is supposed to behold future events in the mirror.

Literature

  • Kurt Benesch: Magic of the Renaissance, pages: 55 and 391 – 395, Fourier Verlag, Wiesbaden, 1985, ISBN 3-921695-91-0.

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Individual references

  1. Kaptromancy. In: Kurt Benesch: Magie der Renaissance, pages: 55 and 391 – 395, Fourier Verlag, Wiesbaden, 1985, ISBN 3-921695-91-0.