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Jumps

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Jumps
Studio album by Herbert Grönemeyer

Publish-
ment(s)

30. April 1986

Recording

September 1985-February 1986

Label(s) EMI

Format(s)

CD, LP

Genre(s)

Rock

Title (number)

10

Length

45:10

Cast
  • Herbert Grönemeyer – Vocals, Keyboards
  • Armin Rühl – Drums, Percussion
  • Alfred Kritzer – Keyboards
  • Norbert Hamm – Bass, Rhythmic Programs
  • Jakob Hansonis – Guitar
  • Gagey Mrozeck – Guitar

Production

Herbert Grönemeyer, Norbert Hamm

Studio(s)

EMI recording studio II, Cologne (Germany)

Chronology
4630 Bochum
(1984)
Jumps Ö
(1988)
Single releases
31. March 1986 Children in power
1986 Dancing

Sprünge is the sixth studio album by German rock musician Herbert Grönemeyer. It was released in April 1986 by EMI.

Background

Grönemeyer was faced with the task of recording a follow-up to the successful album 4630 Bochum. The musician reacted sceptically to the increasing media hype and tried to shield his private life.[1] In September 1985, Grönemeyer went with his band and sound engineer Harald Lepschies to the EMI studio in Cologne. The bassist Norbert Hamm produced the album, which was written by Grönemeyer alone, together with him. The album was released in April 1986.

Sprünge reached number 1 in the charts in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. On 12 June 1986 the album reached platinum status, had sold 500,000 copies.[1] The Sprünge tour of Germany and Austria began on 5 April 1986 in Waldbröl and ran initially until June 1986, followed by, among other things, a performance in front of more than 100,000 spectators at the Anti-WAAhnsinns Festival against the Wackersdorf nuclear reprocessing plant on 26 July 1986. Further concerts were played in June and July 1987, before the tour ended on 12 July 1987 at the Xanten Amphitheater.[2]

The cover, done in pink, features a laughing and jumping “Ink Man” in the lower right corner above the title line located at the bottom.

Texts

Sprünge contains both personal reflections and relationship themes (Mehr geht leider nicht, Nur noch so, Unterwegs) and political pieces. Grönemeyer distinguished himself in the latter respect from songwriters who used music “only to support the lyrics”; for him, music and lyrics must “form a whole”.[1] The song Tanzen is about German national pride, whose “reawakening” Grönemeyer criticizes; Maß aller Dinge addresses apartheid in South Africa.[1] Kinder an die Macht, on the other hand, is a hymn to the impartiality of children.[3]

Title list

  1. Kids to Power – 3:53
  2. Dancing – 6:32
  3. Unfortunately more is not possible – 3:57
  4. Measure of all things – 4:32
  5. Just so – 3:41
  6. On The Road – 5:00
  7. Smile – 4:12
  8. Way Too Much – 4:07
  9. Once – 4:34
  10. Fear – 4:03

Chart positions

Album

ChartsChart positions Highest ranking Weeks
Deutschland (GfK) Germany (GfK)[4] 1 (42 Wo.) 42
Österreich (Ö3) Austria (Ö3)[4] 1 (40 Wo.) 40
Schweiz (IFPI) Switzerland (IFPI)[4] 1 (22 Wo.) 22

Single release

Year Title
Album
Highest Placement, Total Weeks, AwardChart PlacementsChart PlacementsTemplate:Charttable/maintenance/without sources
(year, title, album, placings, weeks, awards, notes)
Notes
DE EN AT AT CH CH
1986 Children in power
Jumps
DE33
(11 Wo.)EN
AT10
(10 Wo.)AT
– —
First release: 31 March 1986

Cultural significance and impact

In November 2015, the German rapper Alligatoah released his single Denkt an die Kinder (Think of the Children), in which he quotes a line from Herbert Grönemeyer’s song Männer and also sings it in Herbert Grönemeyer’s style. The word “Männer” was replaced by “Kinder” (children) and is an allusion to the song Kinder an die Macht.

See also

  • List of the best-selling music albums certified by BVMI in Germany

Individual references

  1. a b c d Roland Kirbach: Aufpassen, dass du nicht abhebst, in: Die Zeit, 25 July 1986.
  2. www.letzte-version.de: Jumps Tour 1986/87
  3. www.musik-base.de: Biography Herbert Grönemeyer
  4. a b c Chart sources: DE AT CH