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Count porn and his girls..

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Film
Original title Count Porno and his girls..
Country of production Germany
Original language German
Year of publication 1969
Length 86 minutes
Age rating FSK 18
Staff
Director Günter Hendel
Script Günter Hendel,
Alois Brummer under the pseudonym Sven Ole Larson
Production Alois Brummer
Music Walter Geiger
Camera Klaus Beckhausen
Edited by Monika Mertens
Cast
  • Rinaldo Talamonti: Harry Holst, nicknamed “Count Porno”..
  • Doris Arden: Elsie
  • Flavia Keyt: Party Girl
  • Marianne Manthey: Gina
  • Eva Brückl: Hannelore
  • Ellen Umlauf: her mother
  • Heinz Plate: her father
  • Erich Fritze: Commissioner
  • Günter Hendel: Journalist
  • Roswitha Randl
  • Fritz Pauli
  • Hellmuth Haupt
  • Stella Mooney

Graf Porno und seine Mädchen… is an early German sex film comedy that launched Alois Brummer’s career as a porn producer in 1968.

Storyline

Clumsy Harry Holst has become a private detective in order to put a stop to a culprit: “Count Porno” had stolen his girlfriend away from him a year ago.

Harry’s first client orders him to visit young Gina in a girls’ boarding school, make inquiries about her reputation and send her home to her uncle in Munich. Gina’s roommate Elsie makes advances to Harry and tries to convince him to investigate a new case together. Gina had secretly taken a bottle of poison – does she want to murder her uncle and aunt?

Together they tail Gina and follow her to a mansion where Count Porno is hosting a sex party with blood young women. Elsie and Harry mingle with the guests and discover a gang of thieves who want to steal the wallets of the guests. Unsuspecting, Harry takes a drug and goes on a psychedelic trip. But at the last minute he is able to call the police and have the thieves arrested. Elsie and Harry become a couple.

Production notes

Graf Porno und seine Mädchen was filmed in 1968 under the title Gelegenheit macht Liebe in Munich-Pasing (at the home of Alois Brummer). The film passed the FSK on January 2, 1969 and premiered on January 19, 1969.

Rinaldo Talamonti, a 21-year-old casual laborer from central Italy, made his debut as a film actor here with the lead or title role and from then on was regularly used in German films as an Italian top dog who was as horny as he was goofy.[1] Talamonti was dubbed by Günter Hendel.

Graf Porno und seine Mädchen was a huge commercial success, after which Brummer turned his attention entirely to making porn films, most recently Hardcore, for the remaining years of his life. This first flick, according to Brummer, cost around DM300,000 and grossed about DM1.4 million.[2] Brummer always paid attention to cost saving in his film production. In addition it said in the same place in the mirror: “The girls are represented by girls – Stripperinnen or also actress Elevinnen before the breakthrough. Brummer finds them with the help of classified ads, and when he has ascertained their impeccable condition, he hires them for a low fee. Because thrift, Brummer’s Bavarian peasant heritage, guides the production process. Others may film a scene seven times, but Brummer only has it shot three times. Studio costs money – Brummer cranks in the cellars, on the stairs and in the living rooms of his home.”

Reception

“They’re not witty, my films, but witty films are no business either.”

Alois Brummer[3]

Filme 1965/70 has the following to say: “Witless and witless pornographic little film.”[4] The Evangelischer Film-Beobachter also thinks nothing of the flick: “Primitive piece of machismo with naked girls and auxiliary school script, which frighteningly demonstrates the incompetence of everyone involved (from director to camera to actors). To be rejected.”[5]

Web links

Individual references

  1. In Kay Weniger’s Das große Personenlexikon des Films, volume 7, page 594, it says: “His part was regularly that of the cliché Southerner, the slang-breaking, always steaming and rutting top dog whose potency and desire prevailed over reason.”
  2. Reportage in Der Spiegel, 21/1969
  3. Der Spiegel from 19 May 1969
  4. Films 1965/70. handbook VIII of Catholic film criticism. Vol. 1. Cologne 1971, p. 118
  5. Evangelical Press Association Munich, Critique No. 88/1969