Article

Read

Conrad von Rosen

from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Conrad von Rosen as Marshal, painting by Hyacinthe Rigaud (1705)

Conrad von Rosen auf Klein-Roop (b. 29 September 1628 at Straupe in Livonia; † 3 August 1715 at Bollweiler in Alsace), Count of Bollweiler and Ettweiler, Knight of the Royal Orders, was a Livonian general in French service, Marshal of France and of Ireland.

Life

Conrad was the fourth of nine children of Fabian I of Rosen (1590-1633)[1] of Klein-Roop[2] and Raiskum[3] (Livonia) and Sophie von Mengden on Idsel and Maikendorf[4] and Maikendorf.[5] He entered Swedish military service in 1644, but was forced to leave the country after killing an officer in a duel. He went to France and in 1651 – at the instigation of the French general Reinhold von Rosen (1605-1667), a relative – entered French military service as an ensign.

Rosen rose rapidly through the ranks. He became a colonel in 1669 and was promoted to brigadier des armées du roi in 1674 for his services at the battle of Seneffe. In 1677 he became maréchal de camp. He was wounded at the siege of Cambrai. In 1678 he served under Marshal Créqui in Germany. In 1681 he converted to the Catholic faith and was rewarded with the title of count. In 1682 he fought under the Marquis de La Trousse in Piedmont, and in 1686 became commander-in-chief in Languedoc.

In 1682 Louis XIV made him lieutenant général and gave him command of the relief contingent that went to Ireland with King James II of England. King James was so convinced of Rosen’s bravery that he appointed him Marshal of Ireland in 1689.

After the defeat at the Boyne by William of Orange, Rosen returned to France, became mestre de camp général of cavalry, and served under the Dauphin in Germany. In 1691 he took part in the siege of Mons, commanded the right wing at the battle of Neerwinden in 1693, and was present at the siege of Charleroi. In the same year he became commander of the Order of St. Louis.

On 20 January 1703 King Louis presented him with the marshal’s baton and allowed him to sell the post of mestre de camp general to the Marquis de Montperoux, who paid him a large sum for it. In 1705 Rosen received the royal orders of chivalry (i.e. the Order of St. Michael and the Order of the Holy Ghost), and from then on he mostly stayed at his chateau at Bollweiler in Alsace, where he died on August 3, 1715, aged 87. He was buried there in a chapel which he had had built in 1693 and provided with a prieuré simple.

Descendants

Conrad von Rosen von Klein-Roop was the founder of the Alsatian line of the Rosen family.[6] He ceded his Livonian estates to his brother Otto († 1709) and took over the Alsatian estates from the inheritance of his wife Marie-Sophie de Rosen (1638-1686) of Gross-Roop, the daughter of Reinhold von Rosen on Ninigal (Päri, Pärsti, Viljandi County), whom he had married in 1650.[7][8] Marie-Sophie died a Lutheran in 1686, having given birth to seven children:

  1. Reinhold Carl von Rosen (1666-1744), also became an officer and General
  2. Georg Christoph, called chevalier de Rosen, converted to the Catholic faith in 1681, killed as a French captain in the battle of Neerwinden in 1693
  3. Anna Johanna (fr.: Anne Jeanne[9]) (1662-1727), married Nikolaus Friedrich Graf von Rothenburg (French: Nicolas-Frédéric de Rothenbourg; 1646-1716) at Masmünster in 1682; their son was Konrad Alexander Comte de Rottembourg (French: Conrad-Alexandre de Rothenbourg), (1684-1735)
  4. Maria Sophia (1673-1740), married Baron Meinrad von Planta von Wildenberg (killed at the Battle of Neerwinden on 29 July 1693) in 1684. From 1684 to 1710 she lived at Wildenstein Castle.[10]
  5. Louisa Maria, nun in Nancy
  6. Johanna Renata, Convent Woman in Nancy
  7. Catharina Magdalena, nun in Nancy

Web links

Individual references

  1. Genealogical Handbook of the Baltic Knighthoods, Part 1,2,: Livonia, Vol.:2, Görlitz, 1929 p.1112
  2. Heinrich von Hagemeister: Materialien zu einer Geschichte der Landgüter Livlands, Teil 1. Riga: E. Frantzen, 1836, p.95 Mazstraupes muiža(Memento of the Originals december 24, 2013 on the Internet Archive) Info:The archive linkwas inserted automatically and has not yet been checked. Please check original and archive link according to instructions and then remove this note.@1@2Template:Webachiv/IABot/www.pilis.lv
  3. Heinrich von Hagemeister: Materials for a History of the Estates of Livonia, Part 1. Riga: E. Frantzen, 1836, p.98
  4. Heinrich von Hagemeister: Materials for a History of the Estates of Livonia, Part 1. Riga: E. Frantzen, 1836, p.167-168
  5. Heinrich von Hagemeister: Materials for a History of the Estates of Livonia, Part 1. Riga: E. Frantzen, 1836, p.149 Roperbeķu muiža (Kalnamuiža)@1@2Template:Dead link/www.pilis.lv(page no longer available, search web archives ) Info: Thelink was automatically marked as broken. Please check the link according to the instructions and then remove this notice.
  6. Genealogical Handbook of the Baltic Knighthoods, Part 1,2,: Livonia, Vol.:2, Görlitz, 1929 p.1115
  7. Genealogical Handbook of the Baltic Knighthoods, Part 2,1.2,:Estonia, Görlitz, 1930 p.220
  8. Genealogical Handbook of the Baltic Knighthoods, Part 1,2,: Livonia, Vol.:2, Görlitz, 1929 p.1110
  9. Dalle funéraire, de Nicolas-Frédéric de Rothenbourg et d’Anne-Jeanne de Rosen à Masevaux
  10. Canton Basel-Landschaft: Wildenstein Castle: location and history