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Bombyx mandarina

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Bombyx mandarina
Präparat von Bombyx mandarina

Preparation of Bombyx mandarina

System
Class: Insects (Insecta)
Order: Butterflies (Lepidoptera)
Family: True spinner (Bombycidae)
Genre: Bombyx
Art: Bombyx mandarina
Scientific name
Bombyx mandarina
(Moore, 1872)

Bombyx mandarina is a butterfly in the true moth family (Bombycidae). It is considered to be the wild form of the silk moth(Bombyx mori).[1]

Features

The moths reach a wingspan of 32 to 45 millimeters. The wings are brown to light brown with light and dark horizontal stripes. The antennae are combed.

The caterpillars reach a length of 35 millimeters and are brown in color. Their front part is colored white. Similar to the caterpillars of the hawkmoths, there is an orange horn on the last segment.

Occurrence and way of life

The moths are distributed in Japan in Hokkaidō, Honshū, Shikoku, Kyushu, Tsushima and Tokara, in China and in South Korea.[2]

The pupation takes place in a cocoon made of silk. In contrast to the domesticated silk moth(Bombyx mori), which is only able to survive in culture and together with Bombyx mandarina forms the entire genus Bombyx, the moth is able to fly and is a widespread species in the wild.

Literature

  • T. Fujii; M. Ozaki; T. Masamoto; S. Katsuma; H. Abe & T. Shimada (2009): A Bombyx mandarina mutant exhibiting translucent larval skin is controlled by the molybdenum cofactor sulfurase gene. – Genes Genet Syst. 2009 Apr;84(2):147-52.
  • K. P. Arunkumar; Muralidhar Metta & J. Nagaraju (2006): Molecular phylogeny of silkmoths reveals the origin of domesticated silkmoth, Bombyx mori from Chinese Bombyx mandarina and paternal inheritance of Antheraea proylei mitochondrial DNA. – Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 40 (2): 419-427. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2006.02.023.
  • T. Nakamura, Y. Banno, T. Nakada, S.-K. Nho, M.K. Xü, K. Ueda, T. Kawarabata, Y. Kawaguchi & K. Koga (1999): Geographic dimorphism of the wild silkworm, Bombyx mandarina, in the chromosome number and the occurrence of a retroposon-like insertion in the arylphorin gene. – Genome 42: 1117-1120 doi:10.1139/g99-072.
  • N. Yoshitake (1968): Phylogenetic aspects on the origin of Japanese race of the silkworm, Bombyx mori L. – Journal of Sericological Sciences of Japan 37: 83-87.
  • K. Yukuhiro; H. Sezutsu; M. Itoh; K. Shimizu & Y. Banno (2002): Significant Levels of Sequence Divergence and Gene Rearrangements Have Occurred Between the Mitochondrial Genomes of the Wild Mulberry Silkmoth, Bombyx mandarina, and its Close Relative, the Domesticated Silkmoth, Bombyx mori. – Molecular Biology and Evolution 19 (8): 1385-1389. PDF

Individual references

  1. K. P. Arunkumar; Muralidhar Metta & J. Nagaraju (2006): Molecular phylogeny of silkmoths reveals the origin of domesticated silkmoth, Bombyx mori from Chinese Bombyx mandarina and paternal inheritance of Antheraea proylei mitochondrial DNA. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 40 (2): 419-427.
  2. Nakamura et al., 1999

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